Previous congresses of the IAA

Previous congresses of the IAA

Congresses

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By Jos de Mul

         I     Berlin (Germany), 1913        II     Paris (France), 1937       III     Venice (Italy), 1956       IV    Athens (Greece), 1960       …

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Volume 18. Krystyna Wilkoszewska (ed.). Aesthetics in Action

Volume 18. Krystyna Wilkoszewska (ed.). Aesthetics in Action

Yearbooks

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By Zoltan

Volume 18. Krystyna Wilkoszewska (ed.). Aesthetics in Action. International Yearbook of Aesthetics. Volume 18. 2014   Content   The 18th…

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Call for Papers – 20th International Congress of Aesthetics, 24-29 July 2016, Seoul, Korea

Call for Papers – 20th International Congress of Aesthetics, 24-29 July 2016, Seoul, Korea

Congresses

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By Zoltan

The 20th International Congress of Aesthetics “Aesthetics and Mass Culture” 24-29 July 2016 (Sunday-Friday) Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea  …

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CFP – Young Scholar Awards – ICA 2016, Seoul

CFP – Young Scholar Awards – ICA 2016, Seoul

Congresses

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By Zoltan

  Young Scholar Awards: Call for Papers   The International Association of Aesthetics cordially invites Ph.D. candidate students to apply…

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Volume 16. Peng Feng (ed.). Aesthetics and Contemporary Art. International Yearbook of Aesthetics. Volume 16. 2012

 

Content

 

The competition between philosophy and the arts can be traced back to the ancient times. In the Twentieth Century, this competition reached its culmination when art was pronounced reaching its end while aesthetics was declared irrelevant to the arts. Formalism abandoned the beautiful in aestheticism, Dadaism betrayed the autonomous or artistic merit in formalism, finally the contemporary conceptual art rejected the aesthetic, and so aesthetics or philosophy of art was totally expelled from the art world. Now we reach a historical stage where art and aesthetics are seeking for a reconciliation. The essays in this book show this new tendency in different ways.    

 

About the Editor

 

Peng Feng is professor of aesthetics and art criticism at Peking University. He is also a playwright, freelance art critic and curator of exhibitions at international level. He has curated over 200 art exhibitions including the China Pavilion at the 54. international art exhibition of Venice Biennale 2011, The 1. International Sculpture Exhibition of Datong Biennale 2011, and The 1. International Art Exhibition of China Xinjiang Biennale. He has published 15 books including Return of Presence: Philosophy, Aesthetics, and Art Theory (Beijing: China Federation of Literary and Art Circles Press, 2016); Arts Studies (Beijing: Peking University Press, 2016), Cross- Disciplines: The Adventure of Aesthetics in Contemporary Art (Beijing: Beijing Normal University Press, 2015); Modern Chinese Aesthetics (Nanjing: Fenghuang Press, 2013); Pervasion: China Pavilion at the 54. International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia (Beijing: People’s Art Press, 2012); Introduction to Aesthetics (Shanghai: Fudan University, 2011); Return of Beauty: 11 Issues of Contemporary Aesthetics (Beijing: Peking University Press, 2009); Perfect Nature (Beijing: Peking University Press, 2005); The Western Aesthetics and the Western Art (Beijing: Peking University Press, 2005), and so on. Since 2013, his musical The Red Lantern has been travelling in China.

Volume 18. Krystyna Wilkoszewska (ed.). Aesthetics in Action. International Yearbook of Aesthetics. Volume 18. 2014

 

Content

 

The 18th volume of the International Yearbook of Aesthetics comprises a selection of papers presented at the 19th International Congress of Aesthetics, which took place in Cracow in 2013. The Congress entitled “Aesthetics in Action” was intended to cover an extended research area of aesthetics going beyond the fine arts towards various forms of human practice. In this way it bore witness to the transformation that aesthetics has been undergoing for a few decades at the turn of the 20th and 21st centuries. 

 

About the Editor

 

Krystyna Wilkoszewska is professor of philosophy and aesthetics and Head of the Department of Aesthetics at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow, Poland. She is President of the Polish Society of Aesthetics and Director of John Dewey Research Center founded by her at the Jagiellonian University. She is a delegate in the Executive Committee in the International Association for Aesthetics and a member of Board in Central European Pragmatist Forum. She was awarded research grants from ACLS and Humboldt Foundation. Her main interest is in pragmatist philosophy and aesthetics, somaesthetics, postmodern philosophy and art, eco-aesthetics, transcultural studies. She published Art as the Rhythm of Life: Reconstruction of John Dewey’s Philosophy of Art; Postmodernism in Philosophy and Art and edited among others three volume Japanese Aesthetics; Vision and Revision; Transcultural Aesthetics; Aesthetics and Cultures. She is editor of the series: “Aesthetics in the World”, “Classics of Polish Aesthetics”. 

Jale Erzen & Raffaele Milani (eds.) Nature and the City. Beauty is Taking on a New Form. International Yearbook of Aesthetics. Volume 17. Sassari: Edzione Edes 2013

Contents

The city, too, is landscape. We can leave it by going into nature exchanging the urban for the rural, but we can also enter the city to live within the architecture and contemplate its forms. Every architectural structure is a landscape and promotes an educational or paedeumatic relationship between the spirit and the environment. Our gaze and our bodies activate a certain way of contemplating that promotes the interchange between the external perception of the physical world and an internal seeing, which is the psychic perception of the visual image. There is a close relationship between the aesthetic experience of the natural environment and that of the urban landscape. In the same way that humankind lives on the earth so, too, it lives in the city.

The theme could be approached from various perspectives such as ‘na­ture/culture’, ‘city as human nature’, ‘ecology and the city’, symbols and metaphors, domesticated nature, nature interiorized, parks and natural en­vironments, and other related issues.

About the Editors

Jale Nejdet Erzen (Izmir University), painter and art historian, publications on Ottoman architecture, painting and aesthetics. Vice president of IAA. Founder and long-time president of Turkish Association of Aesthetics, SAN ART. Affi­liations, Middle East Technical University-Ankara and izmir University Izmir Turkey. Recent publications on urban aesthetics, contemporary art.

Raffaele Milani is Professor of Aesthetics and the author of numerous books, including The Ae­sthetic Categories, The Adventure of Landscape and The Faces of Grace. Philoso­phy, Art, and Nature. Director of the Laboratory of Research on the Cities (Institute for Advanced Studies), University of Bologna. Member of the Eu­ropean Commission at the French Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development on: De la connaissance des paysages à l’action paysagère.

 

Jos de Mul and Renée van de Vall (eds.) Gimme Shelter: Global Discourses in Aesthetics. International Yearbook of Aesthetics. Volume 15. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2013

Contents

Gimme Shelter. Global discourses in aesthetics contains a series of reflections on the impact of globalization on the arts and the aesthetic reflection on the arts. The authors – fifteen distinguished  aestheticians from all over the world -   discuss a variety of aesthetic questions brought forth by the aforementioned process of globalization. How do artistic practices and aesthetic experiences change in response to these developments? How should we articulate these changes on the theoretical level? When reflections on the significance of art and aesthetic experiences can no longer pretend to be universal, is it still possible to lay claim to  a wider validity than merely that of one’s own particular culture? What type of vocabulary allows for mutual – dialogical or even polylogical – exchanges and understandings when different traditions meet, without obliterating local differences? Is there a possibility for a creative re-description of globalization? And is there a meaning of ‘the global’ that cannot be reduced to universalism and unification? Can we seek shelter in a legitimate way?

About the editors

Jos de Mul  is professor of Man and Culture at Erasmus University Rotterdam. He has also taught at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) and Fudan Univer- sity (Shanghai), and has been visiting fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. From 2007 until 2010 he was the President of the International Associa- tion of Aesthetics. His work is on the interface of philosophical anthropology (and its history), aesthetics, and philosophy of technology. English publications include: Romantic Desire in (Post)Modern Art and Philosophy (State University of New York Press, 1999), The Tragedy of Finitude. Dilthey’s Hermeneutics of Life (Yale Univer- sity Press, 2004), Cyberspace Odyssey. Towards a Virtual Ontology and Anthropology (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2010), and Destiny Domesticated. The Rebirth of Tragedy out of the Spirit of Technology (State University of New York Press, 2013). His work has been translated in more than a dozen languages. An extended CV and publication list is available at www.demul.nl.

Renée van de Vall  is professor in Art and Media at Maastricht University where she is chair of the Department of Arts & Literature. She has been president of the Dutch Association for Aesthetics (2002-2006) and is currently Dutch delegate in the Executive Committee of the IAA. Her research interests are philosophical aesthetics and the phenomenology of contemporary visual art and spectatorship. She currently leads an interdisciplinary research project on the theory and ethics of the conservation of contemporary art. Some recent publications are At the Edges of Vision. A Phenomenological Aesthetics of Contemporary Spectatorship (2008); ‘A Penny For Your Thoughts. Brain-scans and the Mediation of Subjective Embodi- ment’ in R. van de Vall & R. Zwijnenberg (eds.) The Body Within: Art, Medicine and Visualisation (2009); and ‘Towards a Theory and Ethics for the Conservation of Contemporary Art’ in Art d’aujourd’hui – patrimoine de demain. Conservation et restauration des oeuvres contemporaines. (2009).